Orthopedic Associates' Blog

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Orthopedic Associates' Blog


3 Exercises to Help You Recover from Meniscus Surgery
3 Exercises to Help You Recover from Meniscus Surgery
Dr. Hulsey Rehabilitating from a torn meniscus starts as soon as you’re in the recovery room. The first three to seven days following meniscus surgery are about protecting the affected region from any damage or infection. Many orthopedic specialists will have you on your feet and walking within a day or even hours of the surgery. This encourages blood flow and protects against muscle atrophy as much as possible. Of course, you will naturally lose some muscle strength due to inactivity and the impact of surgery. When the time is right, here are three exercises to help you recover from meniscus surgery. You can start these exercises within days of your surgery. As always, consult with your orthopedic specialist before beginning any strenuous exercise following surgery. Toe Raises You should be able to stand within a day of undergoing surgery. At the direction and supervision of your orthopedic specialist, you may be able to begin toe raises. Stand next to a sturdy table or counter to support your balance. Slowly rise up on your tees and distribute your weight evenly between both feet. ...

How Runners Can Prevent 7 Common Injuries
How Runners Can Prevent 7 Common Injuries
By: Dr. Pitts There’s a certain amount of pain that is to be expected with running; sore muscles after a long workout or tired feet after a race. A bit of discomfort that can be soothed with a long soak in the tub and rest is nothing unusual. However, there are specific injuries that can happen to runners that require medical attention and recuperation (e.g. no running) time. Many of these injuries can be avoided with a bit of intention and preparation. Here some of the most common running injuries and how to avoid them. Runner’s Knee The medical term for runner’s knee is patellofemoral pain syndrome, but it’s really just a fancy way of saying that you’ve got pain around or behind your kneecap. Runners are repetitively pounding their feet on the ground, and this force is compounded when running downhill or running with weak hips. To prevent this pain, stick with running on flat or uphill surfaces. Avoid hard surfaces (like pavement) and stick to running on grass, a rubberized track or other soft surfaces. If the pain doesn’t go away, ...