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Orthopedic Associates' Blog


Does Your Running Shoe Type Matter?
Does Your Running Shoe Type Matter?
By: Dr. Aaranson   An experienced runner knows a well-fit shoe is priceless, especially when you face the uphill section of a marathon. Improper fits can cause blisters, foot conditions, and a variety of other complications. Shoes is arguably one of the most debated topics among runners: what type of running shoe is best for runners? Support structure is important to consider: how much motion control does your shoe give you? If you’re naturally overpronated in your gait, a shoe ‘expert’ may have recommended a heavier type of shoe with more support. Unfortunately, research shows that the type of running shoe likely doesn’t matter. A recent study published by Aarhus University in Denmark followed the running progression of 927 adults who were novice runners for an entire year. (British Journal of Sports Medicine) The runners were men and women ranging from age 18 to 65. Researchers profiled each runner’s foot to determine their most natural pronation pattern. The runners were then divided into five categories: Neutral pronation ...

Is Running Actually Good For You?
There’s a long standing debate between runners and non-runners: Is running actually good for you? It’s time to find an official answer. Let’s examine the facts: The benefits of aerobic exercise (cardio) are undeniable. It’s widely known that those who regularly engage in cardio experience decreased stress, healthy weight loss, increased heart and lung strength, greater bone density, improved mood, and boosted energy. If we look at the definition of cardio, it is any use of oxygen to meet the demands created by movement via aerobic metabolism. Basically, anything that has your body intaking more air than usual and converting it to energy can be considered aerobic exercise. The question then becomes: Is running, a specific TYPE of cardio, beneficial to the body? To answer, we’ll have to look at the mechanics of the act of running. You’re breathing heavier and your heart is pumping more, but what about all those joints and muscles moving around to facilitate your aerobic experience? Running, by definition, requires that both of your feet be off of the ground simultaneously at some point in your cycle of movement ...