Orthopedic Associates' Blog

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Orthopedic Associates' Blog


How To Get In Shape for Biking The Katy Trail
The Katy Trail is one of Missouri's greatest recreational excursions. 237 miles of glorious twists and turns along the bluffs and banks of the Missouri River is what make the Katy Trail so inviting for travelers along the way. Every year thousands of cyclists take to the Katy Trail to stretch their legs and see the sights along some of Missouri’s most beautiful scenery. Of course, it takes an extreme cyclist to even consider tackling the massive length of the Katy Trail, but many cyclists throughout St. Louis do enjoy a day’s ride between some of the small towns dotted along the trail. Here are a few tips for getting into shape before you swing onto your bike seat and pedal away down the Katy Trail. Start with a shorter distance around your neighborhood or park Most of the Katy Trail is fairly flat, especially compared to other biking trails throughout the country. Don’t let the terrain fool you though; five miles on a bike is still five miles, no matter how steep or smooth the ...

Most Common Softball Injuries and How To Prevent Them
Softball is a fantastic sport for all ages, ranging from competitive fast-pitch to beer league soft toss. Softball matches one of America’s greatest past times with a slower pace of play, providing a great chance to enjoy being outside and get some good exercise. Don’t be fooled though- softball can be a rough sport, especially when it comes to injuries. Here are some of the most common injuries experienced by softball players and how you can prevent them. Pulled hamstring How many times have you seen  a batter hustle down the first-base line only to pull up after thirty feet, grabbing his thigh? The pulled “hammy,” or hamstring, is one of the most common softball injuries, especially among older players. Take the time to carefully stretch out your legs and then do some light jogging before entering full game speed. Shoulder A variety of shoulder injuries happen from playing softball, especially for young pitchers in fast-pitch leagues. The torque required to underhand a fast softball pitch puts significant pressure on important parts of the ...

Healthy Feet Event
HEALTHY FEET EVENT Orthopedic Associates and Fleet Feet are partnering to give your feet the attention they deserve. At May 14th's Healthy Feet seminar, Board Certified Podiatrist Dr. R Randal Aaranson and Fleet Feet owner David Spetnagel will be offering guidance on how to keep every one of the 26 bones in each of your feet healthy.  Particularly designed to benefit runners and folks that are active on their feet, the topics we’ll be kicking around include:  An overview of foot health  Best practices for preventing running injuries  Common foot injuries and recovery techniques  Training opportunities for the novice and advanced runner How your foot gear can affect your foot health Join the experts May 14th, 2015 at 6:30pm at Orthopedic Associates ATTENDENCE AND ADVICE ARE FREE, but an RSVP is requested.

How to recover after running a marathon
Marathon season means runners of all ages are pinning on race bibs and pounding the pavement across St. Louis. If you’ve recently finished your marathon or half-marathon, there’s a good chance you pushed yourself a little too far at one point during the race. Even if you ran a clean race overall, your body still needs time to recover from several weeks, if not months of training.  Here’s some good information to help your body recover after running a marathon… Post-marathon stretches for best recovery Your post-marathon recovery begins as soon as you cross the finish line. You need to carefully and thoroughly stretch your muscles out after a race. This helps remove any remaining lactic acid from your muscles and greatly reduces muscle soreness. Using a foam roller to massage out your thighs and calves is an excellent way to loosen any leftover lactic acid. You may experience DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) in the hours following your race. Pay attention to the level of soreness you experience because it’s an indication of possible injuries ...

Best Nutrients To Boost Your Orthopedic Health
Our bodies need the right types of nutrients to enjoy the best lifestyle possible. Omega 3 Fatty Acids help promote a healthy heart and brain, vitamin C helps fortify your immune system, and iron can improve your kidney function. The adult human body needs at least 1,000 mg. of calcium a day to maintain healthy bones. (National Osteoporosis Foundation) When it comes to your orthopedic health, there are some great nutrients that will help your bones and joints staying fit and functioning well for the life you want to live.  Calcium Our bones need calcium to remain strong and dense. The age-old advice of “Just drink milk!” is still true when it comes to a calcium-healthy diet, but many people also have a lactose-intolerance or are on a vegan or vegetarian diet. Figs, sardines, and dark leafy greens, like bok choy and kale, are all excellent non-dairy sources for calcium. Vitamin D If Calcium is the superhero of orthopedic nutrition, then Vitamin D is its trusty sidekick. This one-two combo works exceptionally well together. Our ...