Orthopedic Associates' Blog

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Orthopedic Associates' Blog


Spring sports safety tips for kids
Spring sports safety tips for kids
Winter is melting away and that means spring is here! Our favorite Cardinals are flying back home to chase another championship and kiddos across St. Louis are gearing up for spring sports season. Whether your favorite family athlete is into soccer, baseball, track, or spring flag football, you want to see them stay safe and healthy this spring. Over 1.2 million children in the U.S. are treated in emergency departments each year due to sports injuries. (SafeKids) Be a good parent and help your kid stay safe this spring with these sports safety tips: Schedule a PPE with your pediatrician - Before signing your kid up for the next sports season, make sure they get a preparticipation physical exam with their pediatrician. You want to know your child’s body is capable of enjoying sports safely. Stretch and warm up first - It’s important for kids to stretch before and after any athletic experience. Be careful that they only stretch to a level ...

Is your shoulder pain a torn rotator cuff?
Is your shoulder pain a torn rotator cuff?
You’re in the garage grabbing boxes from the top shelf when a box starts falling. You reach out to grab the box… filled with books. You immediately feel a sharp pain in your right shoulder. Ow! You reset the box on the shelf, rub your shoulder, and continue working. The next day you notice your shoulder is still really sore and a little stiff. How do you know your shoulder isn’t a torn rotator cuff? What might seem like a minor ache may be your body saying your shoulder needs orthopedic care. Rotator cuff injuries are most common in people age 40 and older. (Mayo Clinic) Here are some of the more common warning signs of a torn rotator cuff: Extend your arm straight out away from your body and try to lower it slowly. If your arm drops suddenly, it’s safe to say you may have a torn rotator cuff. Deep, dull pain in your shoulder joint - If you have ...

Why does my hip keep snapping or popping and is it serious?
Why does my hip keep snapping or popping and is it serious?
Does your hip snap or pop when you move? How do you know if it’s a normal occurrence or if it’s a sign of a more serious condition? Snapping hip syndrome is a condition where your hip makes a snapping or popping sound when you walk, stand up, or reposition your leg. According to the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), snapping hip is, “...most often the result of tightness in the muscles and tendons surrounding the hip. People who are involved in sports and activities that require repeated bending at the hip are more likely to experience snapping hip. Dancers are especially vulnerable.” (AAOS) Snapping hip syndrome is most often pain-free but simply annoying. It occurs most frequently in the outer region of the hip when the iliotibial band (IT band) extends over the greater trochanter portion of the thigh bone. (MedScape) As the band stretches over the protruding greater trochanter, the band can “snap” into place. Other tendons layered over the hip joint, such as the rectus femoris tendon (front of the thigh), iliopsoas tendon (front of the hip), and hamstring ...

What’s Cubital Tunnel Syndrome and how do you treat it?
What’s Cubital Tunnel Syndrome and how do you treat it?
By: Dr. Robert Bell Cubital Tunnel Syndrome isn’t a common name but you may be very familiar with its effect. It can manifest a sharp, tingling pain and weakness in your forearm that extends down through your wrist, hand, and ring and small fingers. Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is the second most common nerve compression condition in the forearm region after Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. (NCBI) The ulnar nerve runs from the lower neck region to the tip of the hand. The cubital tunnel is a narrow region under a protrusion of bone called the medial epicondyle on the inside of the elbow joint. (AAOS) You may be more familiar with this area by its common name of the “funny bone”. Causes of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Cubital Tunnel Syndrome occurs when the ulnar nerve becomes entrapped, irritated, or compressed in the inside portion of the elbow joint. There are several known causes of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome, such as: Overuse of the elbow region - Repetitious movements of the elbow, like playing a sport, using a hammer, or working ...