Orthopedic Associates' Blog

rss

Orthopedic Associates' Blog


What is a cortisone injection?
What is a cortisone injection?
By: Dr. Burke Cortisone injections are designed to relieve inflammation and pain in a targeted area of the body. Cortisone shots are often injected into joints, such as knees, elbows, hips, shoulders, and ankles. With proper application and physician supervision, cortisone injections can be an excellent pain relief solution. Cortisone injections usually include a local anesthetic and a corticosteroid, a powerful anti-inflammatory medication. (Arthritis Health) Cortisone injections are also sometimes prescribed for allergy relief and skin problems, such as psoriasis and acne. The relief is often almost immediate and the patient is able to perform everyday tasks without pain. Cortisone injections are usually limited in application over time due to some potential side effects. Many physicians limit cortisone injections to only three to four times a year at least six weeks between injections. Some potential health risks of cortisone injections include: Osteoporosis near repeated injection sites Joint infection Nerve damage ...

5 leading causes of severe knee pain
5 leading causes of severe knee pain
By: Dr. Noglaski If you have ever had knee pain, you know how it can limit your ability to play and work, even do daily activities. Knee pain happens because of injury, strains, inflammation, or wear and tear over time. Most knee problems are improved with specific exercises or sometimes with medication or surgery. There are five leading causes of severe knee pain that can limit your everyday life. Ligament damage There are four ligaments that connect your thigh bone (femur) with your lower leg. (Healthline) The two collateral ligaments are located on either side of your knee: The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is on the inside of your knee. The lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is on the outside of your knee. The two cruciate ligaments criss-cross each other inside your knee joint to form an “X”: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is towards the front of the inside of your knee. ...

How long does it take a sprained ankle to heal?
How long does it take a sprained ankle to heal?
By: Dr. Hulsey “He’s to the 35, the 30, cuts back inside, to the 25, the 20, and he’s down! Thompson got caught from behind, rolled his ankle, and it doesn’t look pretty!” How many times have you seen a football player sprain their ankle and think, “That looks painful!” A sprained ankle doesn’t happen to just the giants of the gridiron in football. Approximately 25,000 people experience sprained ankles every day. (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society) A sprained ankle can happen during an evening walk, exiting your vehicle, or stepping off a curb. What causes sprained ankles and how long does it take to recover from a sprained ankle? According to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, a sprained ankle is “a stretch injury of the ligaments that support the ankle.” (AOSSM) Your ligaments have some natural dexterity, but even ligaments have their limitations. There are three main types of ankle sprains: Inversion sprain - Occurs when the ankle is rolled inward. Inversion sprains are the most common type of ankle sprains ...

Did I tear my Achilles tendon?
Did I tear my Achilles tendon?
By: Dr. Aaranson Your Achilles tendon provides a vital function of everyday life. Simple exercises like squatting while picking up your toddler to walking around the office can become a challenge with even a minor Achilles tendon injury. If your heel region is hurting, it’s good to know whether it’s Achilles tendinopathy (inflammation and minor tears in a tendon) or a fully ruptured Achilles tendon. There are several known signs and symptoms that appear following a ruptured Achilles tendon injury. Follow this protocol to determine whether you tore your Achilles tendon: The most obvious sign of a ruptured Achilles tendon is a ‘pop’ sound from your heel region. A ‘popped’ Achilles tendon often results in immediate pain throughout the heel. Did you feel an impact on the back of your calf or ankle when the injury occurred? Some patients describe the sensation like getting hit with a rock in the back of the ankle or like someone stepped on their ankle. ...