Orthopedic Associates' Blog

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Orthopedic Associates' Blog


5 need-to-know safety tips this soccer season
5 need-to-know safety tips this soccer season
By: Dr. Burke Fall in St. Louis is a perfect time to put on your long sleeves and stroll the sidelines of a youth soccer game. Whether you love the ref’s eyesight or not, it’s always fun seeing your favorite lil’ soccer player race by in a brightly colored uniform. What you love even more is a fun and safe game without a trip to the ER. Here are five need-to-know safety tips to keep your next Lionel Messi on the field and in the doctor’s office: Drink plenty of water. Yes, this may sound like a tired, broken record, but drinking copious amounts of water will help carry more oxygen to your child’s limbs and brain to make the right move (and reaction) in time. Fall in Missouri can still see temperatures in the high-80s or hotter. With a heavier uniform, shin guards, and the extra heat of running around, staying hydrated is crucial. Stretching is not to be taken lightly. ...

What is Jumper’s Knee?
What is Jumper’s Knee?
By: Dr. Nogalski You hop down from the last few rungs of a ladder and immediately wince in pain. Your left knee gives a sharp twinge. It hasn’t been the same since your pickup basketball game at the gym last week. You may be suffering from jumper’s knee, or patellar tendonitis according to its official name. The patellar tendon connects your kneecap to your shinbone and is designed to work with the range of the knee joint. The patellar tendon helps your knee flex, bend, and absorb impact, like jumping. Overuse of the patellar tendon can occur during activities that require repetitive jumping, like gymnastics, football, basketball, and even everyday activities. Symptoms of jumper’s knee The most telltale sign of jumper’s knee (patellar tendonitis) is a sharp pain between your kneecap and the top of your shinbone. Difficulty bending your knee or doing a small jump can also be a sign of patellar tendonitis. If you are experiencing any noticeable swelling or redness, you should immediately contact your primary care physician. Self-care treatment of jumper’s knee Thankfully, overuse injuries can often heal themselves with ...

How to recover from ACL surgery
How to recover from ACL surgery
By: Dr. Nogalski Approximately 200,000 ACL-related injuries occur in the U.S. every year. Of those 200,000 injuries, an estimated 95,000 injuries are full ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament. Professional athletes and rec-league wonders are familiar with the shin-grasping scene of an ACL injury. If you’re lucky, you may experience only a Grade 1 sprain. Unfortunately, many ACL injuries are at least a Grade 2 sprain, which is a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament. Most Grade 2 ACL sprains and all Grade 3 ACL sprains do require surgery. The recovery period following ACL surgery can be grueling, but the rehabilitation process is worth it. You will probably be given a set of exercises to complete in the recovery room immediately following the surgery. This will encourage good blood flow through your knee to help prevent blood clots. Your primary concerns in the first two weeks following surgery are to reduce swelling in your knee and to keep the incision area clean. Prop your knee up on a pillow four to six times a day to relieve pressure. Your orthopedic specialist ...

7 life-changing facts about Osteoarthritis
7 life-changing facts about Osteoarthritis
By: Dr. Richard Hulsey Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. According to the Center for Disease Control, an estimated 27 million U.S. adults suffer from some extent of osteoarthritis. (CDC) The aches, discomfort, and limited motion caused by osteoarthritis is enough to force a talented supervisor to stop working. It can cause an otherwise healthy grandmother think twice before picking her grandbaby. It can also leave many aging adults in a vulnerable position when it comes to potential injury. While you may know osteoarthritis by name, you may not know how devastating it may be on your future livelihood: If you suffered a significant knee injury in your youth, you are six times more likely to develop osteoarthritis in the injured joint by age 65. If you suffered a hip injury, the risk of developing osteoarthritis in the injured hip region is three times more likely. (HealthCentral) Did you know that osteoarthritis costs the U.S. economy over $86 billion every year? ...