Orthopedic Associates' Blog

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Orthopedic Associates' Blog


How Long Is the Recovery Period from Total Knee Replacement?
How Long Is the Recovery Period from Total Knee Replacement?
By: Dr. Richard Hulsey   If you’re facing knee replacement surgery, you probably have this question on your mind: how long until I’m back to normal after knee replacement surgery? The impact of knee replacement surgery is different for every patient. Your current health condition, medical history, family background, diet, age, and even stress level can play a significant role in your recovery. There are a few common stages of recovery that most patients experience following knee replacement surgery: Initial Recovery: Your orthopedic surgeon will probably want you to be taking a few steps with your new knee within hours of surgery. This encourages blood flow to help prevent blood clots and mobilize any extra fluid received during surgery. You will probably be in the hospital for one or two days following knee replacement surgery. Pain is highly variable but is frequently controlled with a combination of medicines. Weeks 1-2: As you transition home, you may be feeling like your knee feels strong and ...

Does Your Running Shoe Type Matter?
Does Your Running Shoe Type Matter?
By: Dr. Aaranson   An experienced runner knows a well-fit shoe is priceless, especially when you face the uphill section of a marathon. Improper fits can cause blisters, foot conditions, and a variety of other complications. Shoes is arguably one of the most debated topics among runners: what type of running shoe is best for runners? Support structure is important to consider: how much motion control does your shoe give you? If you’re naturally overpronated in your gait, a shoe ‘expert’ may have recommended a heavier type of shoe with more support. Unfortunately, research shows that the type of running shoe likely doesn’t matter. A recent study published by Aarhus University in Denmark followed the running progression of 927 adults who were novice runners for an entire year. (British Journal of Sports Medicine) The runners were men and women ranging from age 18 to 65. Researchers profiled each runner’s foot to determine their most natural pronation pattern. The runners were then divided into five categories: Neutral pronation ...

What's the Difference Between Total Knee and Partial Knee Replacement?
What's the Difference Between Total Knee and Partial Knee Replacement?
By: Dr. Pitts The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality reports that over 600,000 knee replacements are performed in the U.S. each year. (AAOS) While partial knee replacements and total knee replacements may seem near-identical, the comparison is more ‘apples to oranges’. There are three main compartments of a knee: The lateral component - The outside region of the knee, which is where the lateral cruciate ligament, or LCL as it’s often referred to, is located. The medial component - The inside region of the knee where the medial cruciate ligament (MCL) is located. The patellofemoral component - Located at the front of the knee, including the patella and closely connected to the femur, hence the name ‘patellofemoral’. While total knee replacement, or full knee replacement as it’s sometimes called, is highly successful, it’s important to note not all knee osteoarthritis patients suffer from arthritic conditions in all ...

4 Exercises that are Easy on the Knees
4 Exercises that are Easy on the Knees
By: Dr. Richard Hulsey Approximately 19.5% of all U.S. adults say they suffer from knee pain. (The American Academy of Pain Medicine) If you’re reading this, we’re guessing you’re part of the 63 million Americans who experience knee pain on a consistent basis. It affects your work, your everyday movement, and even what type of new activities you’re willing to try. “Oh, I couldn’t do that. My knee hurts too bad.” Staying active may be a challenge with a bum knee, which is why we recommend the following four exercises that are easy on your knees. As with all exercises, you should consult with your primary care physician or orthopedic physician before beginning any new exercises. If you find that any of the following exercises cause pain or discomfort, it’s best if you stop the activity and find a substitute exercise. Straight Leg Raises This may be one of the easier exercises for you to complete. They help tighten the quadriceps without moving the joint. While lying on your back, raise one leg six inches off the floor and hold for five to ten ...

Common Soccer Injuries and How to Treat Them
Common Soccer Injuries and How to Treat Them
By: Dr. Nogalski Spring is a great time for youth soccer. All ages and experience levels of young soccer players will make their way onto the pitch in the next few weeks. As parents we want to cheer on our favorite soccer players while making sure they’re safe. There are a few common injuries that your child may face during this soccer season: Knee injuries - ACL sprains (tears in the anterior cruciate ligament) are some of the most common soccer injuries. Some knee injuries can prevented by wearing the proper size of cleats and being mindful of the situation. Achilles tendonitis - Inflamed or damaged Achilles tendons can occur when a player does not properly stretch or condition prior to the game. The most effective way to prevent Achilles tendonitis for soccer players is for the coaching staff to lead their players in stretching exercises throughout the week, before the game, and following the game. You as a parent can look ...

St. Louis Cardinals Injury Report - April 2017
St. Louis Cardinals Injury Report - April 2017
By: Dr. Bell  Baseball is back in the Lou! After a long winter watching the Cubby Bears finally experience our familiar joy, our Redbirds are back to reclaim the title. With Opening Day kicking off on Sunday evening, we saw a fantastic showing by Carlos Martinez. It gives all of us in Cardinal Nation a good vibe for 2017. Our year will be even better as some of our favorite Cardinals recover on the disabled list. Here is a quick overview of which Cardinals are bouncing back from injuries: John Gant, SP Gant began the 2017 season on the 10-day disabled list. He pitched well during spring training before exiting the Cardinals’ March 25th Grapefruit League game with tightness in his right groin region. Team doctors later confirmed Gant suffered a strained groin muscle. The 24-year-old right-hander was acquired as part of the Jaime Garcia trade with Atlanta during the offseason. He is currently with the Cardinals’ Triple-A Memphis affiliate. Tyler Lyons, RP Lyons underwent surgery on his knee in November. He last pitched in meaningful games on July 30th, but he did return to ...

How Do Your Bones Know When the Weather Is Changing?
How Do Your Bones Know When the Weather Is Changing?
By: Dr. Burke “A storm’s a-comin’. I can feel it in my bones!” You’ve probably heard someone say those same words and it may sound like an old wives’ tale. The reality is there may be some truth to your bones telegraphing when a change in weather is on its way. Barometric pressure shifts with different weather fronts and the fluctuation in pressure has a direct impact on joints and bone. Bones or joints that have experienced a major injury or surgery can be the first place your body experiences change in barometric pressure. It may be why old football injuries ache and your bum knee may not be up for taking the stairs. When the environment is hotter, our muscles tend to be more relaxed and inclined to move well. When the temperature cools, it triggers our muscles and joints to contract more and limit motion as part of our built-in ‘survival’ mode. Some scientists and healthcare leaders hypothesize that headaches and migraines may be early signs of inclement weather. It’s believed that people who suffer from arthritis notice an increasing level ...

St. Patrick’s Day Fun Facts from Orthopedic Associates
St. Patrick’s Day Fun Facts from Orthopedic Associates
By: Dr. Nogalski St. Patrick’s Day is almost here! Shamrocks, leprechauns, pots of gold, and of course, green beer are all in season as the luck of the Irish sweeps across St. Louis. There are all sorts of legends and interesting tidbits about St. Patrick that may surprise you. Here are a few fun facts about St. Patrick and one of St. Louis’ favorite holidays: St. Patrick is the Patron Saint of Ireland, but did you know he wasn’t even Irish? He was English! St. Patrick was born around A.D. 387 in either Scotland or Wales (historians argue over which country is the right birth location). Whether it was Scotland or Wales, both countries were then a part of the Roman Empire. St. Patrick was kidnapped by Irish pirates at age 16. He was brought back to Ireland and sold into slavery. He spent the next six years as a shepherd in the hill country of Ireland. He escaped at age 22 ...

What is hip arthroscopy?
What is hip arthroscopy?
By: Dr. Ryan Pitts Doctors often want to know the extent and severity of an injury or condition without undergoing the risk of invasive surgery. Patients who suffer from hip injuries are at a higher risk of further health complications due to their condition. This is where hip arthroscopy proves its greatest value. According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, hip arthroscopy is a “surgical procedure that allows doctors to view the hip joint without making a large incision (cut) through the skin and other soft tissues.” (AAOS) The surgeon inserts a small camera called an arthroscope into the hip region and takes pictures. Any necessary incisions will be miniscule compared to the full incision required for a more invasive inspection of the joint area. Hip arthroscopy is not as widely used as knee and shoulder arthroscopy, but it is nevertheless still effective. Surgeons often use hip arthroscopy to identify smaller problem areas and conduct minor procedures. Some surgeries that are often conducted during hip arthroscopy include the following, among others: Repairing torn cartilage ...

What is a hip pointer (and how do to treat it)
What is a hip pointer (and how do to treat it)
By: Dr. Pitts Have you ever seen a football player take a blow to the hip and the player immediately uses both hands to press on his hip? The team doctors rush out and help the player limp to the sidelines. A few minutes later the sideline reporter gives the report that the player sustained a ‘hip pointer’. It’s at that moment when you wonder, “What is a hip pointer?” If a hip pointer sounds painful, you’re right; hip pointer can be excruciating to endure. I’d like to share what constitutes as a hip pointer injury, what are the symptoms of a hip pointer, and what treatment options are available for a hip pointer injury. What is a hip pointer injury? A hip pointer occurs during impact on the iliac crest, the fan-shaped or crescent-shaped top of the hip bone. A football helmet hitting the hip joint or a heavy object striking the bony protrusion part of the hip is what can often cause a hip pointer. Symptoms of hip pointer injuries Hip pointers are often presented as severe tenderness and pain when ...